ORNAMENT

In the early years of the MAK’s founding, documenting the development of ornaments and providing exemplary models for arts and crafts counted as the overarching goals for the collection. The directive behind the museum’s work has changed over the years, but the unifying element of ornaments still can be easily discerned.

150 years after the founding of the museum and after many exhibitions on this topic, the MAK DESIGN LAB has mounted a review of the diversity and complexity of the ornament. The emphasis this time around is on contemporary times. The point is not to define the term ornament, but to show a state of being and to bring awareness to the role that ornaments play in our lives.

Interest in “rhythmic” composition through the employment of repeating elements—and progressing beyond it—can be seen today in numerous media. From the products we use every day to the fine arts, ornaments act as an intermediary between our sense for design and our daily lives.

After the opening is before the opening—the topic area Ornament in the MAK DESIGN LAB consists of interchangeable thematic blocks and will be modified over time. What we exhibit will in no small part be defined by the ideas and suggestions of our visitors, because nowadays it is less the viewing of art than consumer demand that drives the appearance and form of ornaments.
Rosette from the time of Sultan Husam ad-Din Lajin: Minbar of the Ibn-Tulun mosque (9th c.), Egypt, Cairo, dated 1296, Wood panel, carved, with intarsia and assembled
Insights
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Why Do I Wear Adornment?
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The Artists Speak ...
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Objects in Focus
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Ornament, Experiment!
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Rosette from the time of Sultan Husam ad-Din Lajin

Minbar of the Ibn-Tulun mosque (9th c.), Egypt, Cairo, dated 1296, Wood panel, carved, with intarsia and assembled

1398759049285
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1398759049285
false
1398759049285
false
1398759049285
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